Healthy Ponds

Ailing Stormwater Pond

Ailing Stormwater Pond

With stormwater the source of 65% of the excess nutrients in Sarasota Bay and most of our local stormwater ponds functioning at only 40% to 60% efficiency, START began a Healthy Pond Program in 2021 with funding from the Gulf Coast Community Foundation in Sarasota County to help neighborhoods clean up ponds that look like the one shown above. By the end of the planting season in 2021, START had worked with the Sarasota County Nest program to advise nine different neighborhood communities on how to enhance the appearance and efficiency of their stormwater ponds and provide funding to help cover the cost of the aquatic plants necessary for a successful pond enhancement program.

During the same period, START used a Chiles-Moore grant to help four neighborhood communities in Manatee County improve their ailing stormwater ponds with counselling and funding for aquatic plant stock.
The success of these two pilot programs led to START receiving a major three-year grant from the Charles & Margery Barancik Foundation to expand this important water quality program. This funding created the Healthy Pond Collaborative, administered by START and assisted in field operations by the Sarasota County NEST program and the University of Florida IFAS Sarasota Extension with creative and marketing assistance from the Science and Environment Council of Southwest Florida. This program will enable us to reach more communities with advice and funding to help them develop and sustain an ongoing maintenance program for the health of their stormwater ponds.

Healthy Stormwater Pond

Healthy Stormwater Pond

The objective of the Healthy Pond Collaborative is to reach more local communities with advice and funding to help them develop and sustain a successful ongoing pond maintenance program as illustrated in the above picture. This involves the use of the four basic elements that create a healthy pond including:

  1. The use of best irrigation and fertilizer practices in the upland area above the pond
  2. The creation of a “No Mow Zone” around the perimeter of the of the pond that is at least 8 inches to 12 inches high and at least 3 feet wide
  3. The use of aquatic plants on at least 30% to 50% of the Littoral Shelf or shallow area of the pond
  4. The minimal use of herbicide and pest sprays in and around the pond

The best irrigation and fertilizer practices in the upland area reduce the amount of excess water and nutrients that enter the pond that foster unsightly algal growth. The “No Mow Zone” with taller grass acts as a buffer to help block fertilizer and grass clippings from entering the pond. The “No Mow Zone” also keeps heavy lawnmowers off the pond bank that weaken the bank and cause damaging erosion. The aquatic plants that are funded by the grant also help fight erosion from wind and waves lapping up against the pond bank.
If you want some help in keeping your stormwater ponds attractive and healthy with assistance from the Healthy Pond Collaborative, contact Sandy Gilbert with START at (941) 217-5151.