Bost moored off the coast of Florida
Preserving Our Coastal Waters
START Educates the public about Red Tide and our Coastal Waters
With Public Education
Oyster shell recycling
And Programs
Nutrients in the Waterway
That Reduce Nutrients
Fish kill from Red TIde
That Feed Red Tide
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Mini Reef Special Sales Promotion

START is launching a Special Sales Promotion on under dock mini reefs for waterside residents on the Sun Coast. The units fit under your dock and provide habitat for sea life that filter excess nutrients from the water and attract a wide variety of fish as shown in the above picture taken at the Mar Vista Dockside Restaurant on Longboat Key.

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START Volunteers

What Does START Do?

What does START do to help reduce excess nutrients in our waterways? START has a three-pronged approach to help reduce excess nutrients including the Gulf Coast Oyster Recycling Program (GCORR) and clam seeding program.

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Dead fish in Canals from Red Tide

Let’s Do More

Join START, other organizations and concerned citizens to form a grass roots coalition to ensure that our federal, State and local policy makers take action to keep unwanted nutrients that feed red tide out of our waterways. To help, contact us now.

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Resources

Resources

Doing all you can to help preserve our coastal waters? Do you know how your lifestyle can impact the ocean's water quality? Do you know what to do when we have a red tide bloom? Learn more with START’s available educational resource materials.

More About Our Resources

Headline News

A study published recently in the journal Biological Conservation used satellites to track threatened loggerhead sea turtles. Researchers with Mote Marine Laboratory, the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Florida, first tagged the turtles from nesting areas on Casey Key, the Dry Tortugas and Cape San Blas. The female’s migrations were then tracked. A [...]

The University of South Florida has announced a joint effort between its College of Marine Science and scientists in Mexico to study red tide. This scientific cooperation between states and nations who depend on the Gulf is producing more accurate tracking of red tide. USF News reports that Biological Oceanographer Frank Muller-Karger, a member of [...]

In a status report  released by FWRI on January 20, 2012, the Karenia brevis bloom which has been present in southwest Florida for the past several months was only detected along two shore areas.  Very low concentrations were detected at Lighthouse Beach and Lovers Key State Park (southern Lee County) and very low to low [...]

Despite the relatively low concentration of red tide, some sea creatures are still being taken to rehabilitation clinics in Collier and Lee counties. Since December, Sanibel’s Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife, has treated a variety of seabirds including 30 cormorants, 12 pelicans and a herring gull that was given a shake with a special [...]

On another front, the Sarasota Dolphin Research Program is currently studying the genetic susceptibility of bottlenose dolphins to red tides.  Several large scale mortality events of dolphins in the Florida Panhandle have been associated with a red tide bloom.  Yet, dolphin populations in central-west Florida, including Sarasota Bay, have suffered little red tide-related mortality although [...]

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