stormwater

Like many communities, VillageWalk in Sarasota suffered some major tree damage during hurricane Ian. The damage was particularly severe along Camminare Drive where over 100 trees and shrubs were lost. This is a critical section of the community as the tree canopy and shrubs provided both cover from an unsightly aging wall bordering I-75 and [...]

Recently, NOAA issued a press release announcing new high resolution land cover data to help communities understand coastal change. The Bipartisan Infrastructure Law provided $8 million to support this land cover information across the country. The image above on the right shows 30 meter land cover data for Shelter Bay in Skagit County, Washington, while [...]

Extensive algal growth is a key sign that your stormwater ponds are not healthy. You have excess nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) in the water that sustains ever-expanding algae. Unsightly algal blooms reduce the efficiency of your ponds to filter stormwater as it flows downstream to the Bay and the Gulf providing a food source for [...]

Some of your ponds may even show signs of costly erosion as shown above. Bank erosion will fill up your pond with soil limiting its capacity to hold stormwater requiring costly bank remediation or even dredging. If your community is facing these problems with your ponds, you should contact our Healthy Pond Collaborative (HPC) for [...]

The Science & Technology Society hosted a panel discussion with red tide experts on the evening of April 17th at the Planetarium in the Bishop Museum of Science and Nature in Bradenton. The panel discussed the many facets of red tide from what causes it, concerns about its impacts on the environment, our economy and [...]

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